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Sori () - Curvature of Japanese Swords
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Sori, also pronounced zori, is the curvature of the Japanese sword, and is always referenced to the mune ('back' of the blade). It is determined by locating the deepest part of the curvature of the blade between the kissaki (tip), and the mune-machi (the notch on the back of the blade where the habaki seats.)

Torri-zori@()

The deepest part of the curve is at the center of the blade.

Koshi-zori@()

The deepest part of the curvature is between the center of the blade and the Munemachi. Most early Bizen blades and many late Kamakura blades have Koshi-zori.

Saki-zori@()

This is the curve seen most commonly on Naginata. The deepest part of the curvature is between the center and the tip of the blade. This sori can be seen in some swords from the early Muromachi period. These blades are usually described as 'tending toward' saki sori. The curvature is seldom as  pronounced as it is in  this Naginata.

Uchi-zore@()

When the sword curves the opposite way from the above shapes, or towards the edge, its called Uchi-zori. Tanto made during the Kamakura period usually have Uchi-zori. This is a very slight curvature toward the cutting edge.

Mu-zori@()

A blade with very little or no curvature has Mu-zori or none.